CHICAGO — The City Council approved an unprecedented reparations package on Wednesday that will pay $5.5 million and provide other benefits to torture victims of notorious former police commander Jon Burge.

The vote caps a decades-long push for restitution to some of the more than 100 victims — mostly African-American men — who have alleged horrific abuse by police officers under Burge’s command.

From 1972 through 1991, the suspects were subjected to mock executions and electric shock and beaten with telephone books as their interrogators flung racial epithets at them. A Chicago Police Department review board ruled in 1993 that Burge’s officers had used torture, and he was fired.

Burge and his officers have denied wrongdoing.

The statute of limitations ran out on his alleged crimes, but Burge was convicted in 2010 of perjury in civil proceedings for lying about torture he oversaw. He was sentenced to 4½ years in prison and completed his sentence this year. Burge continues to receive a police pension.

“This stain cannot be removed from our city’s history but it can be used as a lesson of what not to do,” Mayor Rahm Emanuel said.

Alderman Howard Brookins said Burge’s actions were an “atrocity” and called the reparations “a meaningful settlement.”

“I want to say to the rest of the world and Chicago, we get it,” Brookins said. “That type of behavior will not be tolerated in our city, and we can work together bringing the community and the people together for the betterment of our city.”

Victims who have a credible claim will receive up to $100,000 each.

In addition, the Chicago City Council will formally apologize, create a permanent memorial recognizing the victims and teach public school students about the Burge case in their eighth- and 10th-grade history classes.

City college tuition and job training will be provided free to Burge victims, their immediate family members and their grandchildren. The city will fund psychological, family, substance abuse and other counseling services to Burge victims and their immediate family members.

Chicago had already spent about $100 million on settlements and legal fees related to lawsuits over Burge’s actions.

Burge’s victims have 60 days from Wednesday’s passage of the ordinance to make their claim for reparations, said Joey Mogul, of the Chicago Torture Justice Memorials and the People’s Law Office. Disputes on a victim’s claim will be decided by a third-party arbiter agreed upon by the city and the victim’s representatives.

Amnesty International USA, which was among several human rights groups that pressed Chicago to pay restitution to Burge’s victims, said the council’s decision will have repercussions beyond the Windy City.

“Chicago has taken a historic step to show the country, and the world, that there should be no expiration date on reparations for crimes as heinous as torture,” said Steven Hawkins, Amnesty International USA’s executive director. “The United States is a country desperately in need of a more accountable police force. Passing this ordinance will not only give long-overdue reparations to survivors, it will help set a precedent of U.S. authorities taking concrete measures to hold torturers accountable.”

  • 5 things to know about Britain's election
  • Ferguson pizzeria destroyed twice won't retreat
  • Baltimore Mayor asks DOJ to investigate police
  • Sheriff not arrested for shooting woman breaks silence
  • Did the FBI miss the chance to stop the Texas shooters?
  • Hostage pleads for help in online pizza order
  • Remote Nepalese villages wait for help after quake
  • Wolff: UK election may yield no winning party
  • Investigators: Germanwings co-pilot Lubitz tried dry run
  • Mom escapes hostage situation by ordering pizza
  • FBI had 'active investigation' on Texas attack suspect
  • Fugitive captured after 56 years on the run
  • Calif. residents skirt drought rule by using wastewater
  • UK elections: Hung parliaments and how to fix them
  • Grandmother of Dallas shooter speaks out
  • Suspect in Hannah Graham murder sees charges upgraded
  • Cinco de Mayo celebrated in U.S., not so much in Mexico
  • Toddler Rescued from Philadelphia Roof
  • Kittens shock mechanic after hundreds of miles under car
  • Five day solar flight prepares for takeoff
  • Idaho police sergeant shot and killed on patrol
  • Do you know your tequila?
  • Obama nominates Joseph Dunford to chair Joint Chiefs
  • What to know if you're stopped by police
  • US trekker captures moment of earthquake hitting Nepal village
  • U.S. one of the worst places for mothers
  • Periscope app causes copyright concerns
  • Police say Waze app puts officers in danger
  • Expert: 1st amendment, religious tolerance can coexist
  • Raw: Video of migrant rescue off sinking dinghy
  • Texas attack suspect's mom doesn't blame police
  • Police: Suspects hit officers with cars
  • To curb huge housing shortage, NY turns to apartments'
  • Mom wants FBI to investigate cops who kill the unarmed
  • Family of Texas attack suspect: We had no idea
  • Sensors let adult children monitor aging parents
  • Islamic State claims responsibility for Texas attack
  • Former FBI agent charged NSA, CIA headquarters
  • Storm pounds Calif. coast with huge waves
  • Bookies lose a fortune on royal baby's name
  • Hillary Clinton agrees to testify on Benghazi
  • Police were 'ready' when gunmen attacked Texas exhibit
  • Shooting at Mohammed exhibit prompts review of facility
  • Utah ATV protest ride
  • Boston bomber emotional as family takes stand
  • 5 months and no charges: Tamir Rice's family seeks justice
  • Ga. Police: Sheriff Shot Woman, Wouldn't Talk
  • Over-serving alcohol is perfectly legal in this state
  • Police: Texas officer 'probably saved lives'
  • 93% of town's revenue is from traffic tickets and fees
  • Are more Americans losing their religion?
  • Former Christie appointee says he's innocent
  • What Mom really wants for Mother's Day
  • FBI: Mohammed exhibit shooting suspects were roommates
  • Inside look at training New York police officers
  • Raw: FBI searches Ariz. home linked to TX gunmen
  • Centenarian's rescue from Nepal rubble is welcome news
  • Billboard for gay conversion therapy prompts protest
  • 4 black officers held at gunpoint by police
  • Disease fears hit Nepal's quake-hit homeless
  • Two gunmen shot dead outside Mohammed cartoon exhibit
  • Baltimore begins recovery after curfew lifted
  • Top three ways to celebrate 'Star Wars' Day
  • Ben Carson’s 2016 presidential run: Why it matters
  • Raw: Four dead in shooting spree on Wisconsin trail
  • Rare condition caused teen to gain 150 pounds
  • Dachau liberation 70 years ago remembered
  • Prosecutor Marilyn Mosby praised by Baltimore residents
  • Meet Marilyn Mosby, prosecutor in Freddie Gray case
  • Freddie Gray's family satisfied with charges
  • Freddie Gray: A timeline of the Baltimore uprising
  • Police union: Charges are a 'rush to judgment'
  • Relief, reservation in Baltimore after officers charged
  • Orphans survive plane crash, meet 40 years later
  • Congressman thanks God for charges in Gray death
  • Officers charged in Freddie Gray death
  • NJ Prosecutor: 3 former Christie allies charged
  • Indictments, guilty plea in 'Bridgegate' scandal case
  • Parking garage collapses at Watergate Hotel
  • Underwater volcano erupts off Oregon coast
  • Swastika featured in car dealership ad angers customer
  • Carter: military sex assaults 'far too many'
  • Frostburg State University combats excessive student drinking
  • Why Freddie Gray's arrest was illegal
  • Raw: Drone flyover reveals Nepal damage
  • Cannabis oil patient dies weeks after GA legalizes it
  • Fired Popeyes manager: $5.5M demand wasn't my idea
  • Cop describes 'horrendous' Aurora theater shooting
  • Raw: Sea lion rescued from San Francisco street
  • Baltimore business owners say curfew hurting them
  • Elon Musk is selling battery packs for houses
  • Raw: Moment Nepal quake strikes ancient square
  • Sanders on 2016: 'We're in this race to win'
  • Ray Lewis: 'Stop talking about old Baltimore'
  • Low-key ceremony at US consulate 40 years after fall of Saigon
  • Student calls out racist catalog cover, loses campus jobs
  • Kid moderator interrupts Obama
  • Court sentences Malala Yousafzai attackers to life in prison
  • Police turn over report on Freddie Gray
  • From Washington to Clinton: Most controversial presidential pardons
  • Punchlines: Pope pushes priests to pep up preaching
  • Schools served kids 6-year-old pork for lunch
  • NORAD can't spot difference between gyrocopter, goose
  • Raw: Death toll climbs on Mount Everest
  • Daily life at Kathmandu's makeshift tents
  • Tallywackers: All-male version of Hooters to open
  • Woman who threatened to kill white cops has legal degree
  • Fired Popeyes manager suing for $5.5 million
  • Raw: Teenage Boy Rescued in Nepal
  • Report: Gray banged against walls, tried to hurt himself
  • Drought forces salmon hitch a ride to ocean
  • Nigeria working to identify nearly 300 rescued women, girls
  • Drone footage of Kathmandu, Nepal
  • 40 years later: Communism's hollow victory in Vietnam
  • Vietnam veterans finally welcomed home in this state
  • Baltimore mom: Teaching son 'right from wrong'
  • Raw: Protesters Disrupt New York Traffic
  • Synthetic drug flakka triggers bizarre episodes
  • Japanese Prime Minister Abe offers condolences for WWII
  • Heartwarming scenes from the streets of Baltimore
  • Watch aggressive drivers plow toward kids at bus stops
  • Clinton: Baltimore violence has to stop
  • Baltimore relatively quiet after curfew arrests.
  • Raw: Nepal man alive after 82 hours in rubble
  • Theater shooting survivors describe night of horror
  • Hillary Clinton: All police should have body cameras
  • Protesters call for apology from Japan's Abe
  • Eighth-Graders struggling in U.S. history, civics classes
  • Time-lapse: Nik Wallenda walks spinning Orlando Eye
  • Baltimore PD: City stable after first night of curfew
  • Baltimore cleans the streets following previous day after riots
  • New unrest in Ferguson mirrors Baltimore
  • Raw: More survivors rescued in Nepal
  • Do people believe in love at first sight?
  • Russians lose control of ISS cargo craft
  • 'Submarine river' proposed to ease California drought
  • Nigerian rescue highlights scope of Boko Haram kidnappings
  • French 'spiderman' climbs Paris tower for Nepal victims
  • Second-life for flowers laid at Armenian genocide memorial